Feature

The Warmth of Other Suns

This is a still from Adrian Paci’s video, “Centro di permanenza temporanea” (Temporary Detention Center), showing men and women from Latin America getting ready to board a plane that never arrives. It’s part of a major exhibition on migration on now in the U.S.

Mappa, Alighiero Boetti (1972) Embroidery on fabric, 63 x 93 in., Dia Art Foundation

The Warmth of Other Suns (Stories of Global Displacement) is on through Sept. 22, 2019 at The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C.  The works by 75 artists from around the world pose urgent questions in the midst of today’s global refugee crisis.

Through installations, videos, paintings, and documentary images, the exhibition brings together a multitude of voices and “exposes the universality of migration as an experience shared by many,” The Phillips Collection says. Above: For “La Mer Morte (The Dead Sea),” French-Algerian artist Kader Attia covered the floor in blue clothing as if the wearers had disappeared into the sea. (Photo credit: WAMU.org)

Florida migrants on their way to New Jersey to pick potatoes. 1940. Jack Delano / Library of Congress

Sharing its title with Isabel Wilkerson’s award-winning book on the Great Migration, The Warmth of Other Suns is “anchored by an important reference to the decades-long exodus of over six million African-Americans from the brutality and discrimination that ruled the American South,” exhibition notes say.

“Selections from Jacob Lawrence’s powerful Migration Series (1940-41), a cornerstone of The Phillips Collection, will be among the historical works featured in the show.”

Exhibition site, here.

Adrian Paci’s video, “Centro di permanenza temporanea” (Temporary Detention Center) here.

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