Suzanne Tevlin: Eruptions

These paintings by artist and educator Suzanne Tevlin are part of a wide body of work that includes series on Darwin, The Weather and Dante’s Divine Comedy.   The University of Toronto lecturer, art historian and writer has an international reputation that has prompted invitations from museums across Europe and North America.  (Above: Tornado,  charcoal & gouache on paper, 47 x 32″)

-After the Deluge: Fire after the Tsunami, oil on board, embossed brass, printer’s ink, 37 x 47 x 2″

This new work (Invisible, Visible, 42 x 60,” oil on Mylar) references Operation Crossroads, American nuclear weapon tests conducted in the Pacific in mid-1946.

The painting “is about the invisible made visible, something that has always fascinated me. Visible air, visible love, visible atmosphere. This is why I do so many similar images of volcanoes, tornadoes, trains….etc…..the invisible made visible. –Suzanne Tevlin

Burning Mountain: Wild Fire, oil on birch support, embossed brass, printer’s ink, 37 x 47 x 2″

Campi Phlegraei 1776, oil on board, embossed  brass, printers ink, 47 x 37″

Campi Phlegraei, or Flaming Fields, by Sir William Hamilton, Britain’s envoy to the Spanish court at Naples, documented the late 18th century eruptions of Mount Vesuvius in 54 hand-colored plates by the artist Peter Fabris.

Suzanne Tevlin’s website, here

Her blog, here

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There are 6 comments

  1. michellecfecit

    it is what makes them!

    i sometimes apply objects to my canvasses. it can be difficult ’cause the application can make the whole effect cumbersome but the brass works, especially in ‘burning mountain’.
    the vertical texture of the brass here acts like shadows that the trees might be casting, onto
    a river or some body of water even.

    Like

      1. michellecfecit

        it’s nice to know that someone appreciates my observations!!**!*

        in ‘after the deluge’ i see the brass as a cross section of the earth
        that’s painted above.

        it’s so nice to have this blog to come to boomeron!
        i don’t have much time to paint & visiting your blog makes me feel as though i’m still immersed in it.
        as though i’m back at university – the immersed part, not the 20 years younger part!!

        Like

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